Curatorial

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New York Meets Tbilisi: Defining Otherness Part II at Kunstraum, Brooklyn presented in conjunction with Kunstraum LLC as part of my curatorial residency at Kunstraum 2019-2020

March 1-April 5,2020

Artists: Anuk Beluga, Nino Biniashvili, Tim Foley, Rita Khachaturian, Tamara Kvesitadze, Dana Levy, Shiri Mordechay, Mariam Natroshvili & Detu Jincharadze, Andy Ralph, Giorgi Rodionov, Mikheil Sulakauri

From press release:

Bringing the rare dialogue between contemporary Georgian and American art to New York, Kunstraum is pleased to present New York Meets Tbilisi: Defining Otherness – Part 2. As the result of a year-long period of curatorial research as Kunstraum’s Curator-in-Residence, Nina Mdivani sets works by eight Georgian and four American artists into relation to facilitate a discussion on Otherness – and what it potentially means.

Compassion, sympathy, possessiveness, infatuation, mistrust, anger, rage, an ability or inability to relate— all of these affects derive either from a pull of belonging or a push towards a threatening annihilation of the self. At times, they are projected towards a single being, a distinct society, an architecture, languages or cultural iconography. The purpose of this two-part, Georgian-American exhibition is to explore and evoke emotions and perspectives that habitually arise when we confront the other on a micro or macro scale.

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New York Meets Tbilisi: Defining Otherness Part I at Assembly Room,NYC presented in conjunction with Kunstraum LLC as part of my curatorial residency at Kunstraum 2019-2020

January 17-February 23,2020

Artists: Rusudan Khizanishvili, Juliana Cerqueira Leite

From press release:

The main question this exhibition poses is how the phenomenon of Otherness is defined when examined in relation to two different cultures and understandings of the world, as well as considers onlookers’ reactions when experiencing Otherness in the form of a person different from their own race, orientation, or background. Another subtler dimension of this important fundamental question is how Otherness is encountered within one’s own persona, whether it be in the form of prejudice or shared historical and collective memory. As Georgia has been undergoing significant transformation within the last thirty years, the country has to recognize its Soviet past, along with the mechanisms that have helped it to survive for centuries. Georgian art has mirrored this journey, at times reverting to mimicry through a Soviet or Western visual language, and at other times by producing strongly authentic work. Similarly, Otherness is experienced at many different levels in the United States that have led in the past to racial violence as well as to intra-cultural consensus.

Relevant Links:

New York Meets Tbilisi: Defining Otherness – Part I

/https://www.kunstraumllc.com/single-post/2019/12/22/New-York-Meets-Tbilisi-Defining-Otherness—Part-I

Nina Mdivani – NY Meets Tbilisi: Defining Otherness Part I & II

Kennst Du eigentlich? Heute: Assembly Room

https://www.artsy.net/assembly-room/shows

 

 

 

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Material Landscape, Social Landscape: Human Presence Kunstraum LLC, Brooklyn a summer member show and part of my 2019-2020 Curator in Residence program and realized with Kunstraum team

 July 14 – 28, 2019

 

Assistant Curator Helene Remmel

Artists (Members of Kunstraum LLC):  Dorothy Aretha Alexis, Alex Jamieson, Wendy Krausbeck, Alex La Ferla, Paola Morales, Jaclyn Mottola, Rita Nannini, Sheri Shih Hui, Matthew Sprung, Therese Tripoli

 

From press release:

Ever since coming into this world, humans have consistently acted as architects and manufacturers of their environment. As civilization progressed, we made discoveries and advances previously unimaginable to the human mind, yet, consequently we allowed our habitat to be demolished. We can communicate in seconds around the globe or make nanotools for microsurgery, while simultaneously the world’s species and habitats have been invaded, destroyed, displaced, and made extinct. Fortunately, nature has its own potential for power and affect. We are not immune to it – psychologically or physically. The range of works included in the exhibition address the interrelationships between humans and their environments – natural or manmade.

Relevant Links:

https://www.kunstraumllc.com/single-post/2019/06/15/Material-Landscape-Social-Landscape-Human-Presence

http://artdaily.cc/news/115278/-Material-Landscape–Social-Landscape–Human-Presence–on-view-at-Kunstraum-LLC#.XaKU5i-ZN-U

 

 

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King is Female: 3+1 at Kunstverein Villa Wessel, Germany in conjunction with Kornfeld Galerie, Berlin

September 8 – November 11, 2018

Artists: Natela Grigolashvili, Natela Iankoshvili, Rusudan Khizanishvili, Tamara Kvesitadze

From press release:

King is Female: 3+1 questions identities of modern Georgian women: visual and psychological traditions that are currently in the process of deep internal metamorphosis. This process is not unique to Georgia and because of this the exhibition has a larger context. Role of women has drastically changed in the last hundred years, through education, emancipation, increased global numbers women are gaining more influence, although they fight hard to balance this newly found independence with traditional feminine archetype of a caring mother and a loving spouse. The upcoming exhibition explores this duality on the example of a small country where women have been historically strong, yet, invisible

Relevant Links:

http://www.villa-wessel.de/AusstellungsSeiten/2018_Ausst_3_September/2018_ausst_3_september.html

 

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Natela Iankoshvili Centennial Exhibition at Museum of Modern Art, Tbilisi, Georgia

June 2018

Co-curator Mamuka Bliadze

Artist: Natela Iankoshvili

From press release:

Natela Iankoshvili attracts the eye and captivates you with mystical darkness and searching for light. In 1970s she reinvented old Georgian color contrasts, dating back to medieval frescoes and primitivism, by creating new forms of visual tradition. By transforming old forms of Georgian landscape into a new neo-expressionist mode Iankoshvili opened up the painterly dispute, bringing in fresh thinking and paving way for daring young Georgian artists of today.

Relevant Links:

http://samshoblo.online/?newsid=1265

 

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Conversion Device of Rusudan at Mark Rothko Foundation, Latvia

April 20-June 24, 2018

Artist: Rusudan Khizanishvili

From press release:

There are two sides to the global story that Rusudan’s neo-expressionist paintings in this exhibition highlight, and they both address existential concerns with the reality of subjective experience. First is a more metaphysical, cerebral approach to the complex and painful ongoing social transformation. We all witness total digitalization of human society, our smartphones have already become our extra palms, but this disconnect from physical reality (inevitably reconstructed into pixels) produces an equal longing towards nature, desire to reunite with it, to reconquer our animal and plant selves. In her series “Into the Nature” (with “Conversion Device” being the central painting), Rusudan explores this unique process. Flora is merging into fauna and, through blurring of these organic lines, a human being also becomes a part of them. In her vision, humans become integral parts of nature on a deeper biological level, they become a new species by going back to their roots. In the day-to-day reality of total information flow, we are drawn by the incomprehensible and the strange, and what could be stranger then nature? It is a metaphysical creation of a parallel world, which becomes intelligible to others without words.

 

Relevant Links:

Speechless: New Visual Semantics